Gum Disease and Smoking-It’s so Glamorous


Smoke Free for 9 days!

There is a couple of things I want to talk about today regarding not-smoking and this new life I have chosen for myself. First, for all of you young people that are smoking out there, one of the many disadvantages to smoking is Gum Disease. If I wasn’t so vain I would take a picture of my teeth and show you.

This picture from Oral Health Information is pretty close. It’s not pretty is it girls! Trust me, quit smoking now so this doesn’t happen to you. The Oral Health Information site has a lot of good information about quitting smoking. Check it out!

Gum Diseased Teeth

Today I am having six teeth pulled on my upper mouth. Having made the decision to get dentures, which I should have done a long time ago, this is the first step of many and it is painful and awful to go through. No, it’s not as horrible as Lung Cancer, but it is something a lot of us, especially us ladies, particularly single ladies, don’t want to have to do in our lifetime. They are pulling six today and the other six on top, (the front ones) in three weeks. Unfortunately, I have a big mouth and when I smile you can see all my teeth,even in the back. So…for the next three weeks I am going to have to not smile. Isn’t that just great. I have been trying not to smile to big for about two years now since my teeth got really bad, it doesn’t always work because basically I am a happy person and have always smiled at people, strangers and all, just about all my life. It would be interesting to see their reaction though! 🙂 Just kidding, maybe..

Please read the article below. I will write more when I can. The other topic I want to talk about is Yoga, and Pilates and how much I hate them because they make me sick, (like motion sickness) nauseated, dizzy and I’ve had to run out of class because I thought I was going to throw up!

TTFN

Here is what the American Academy of Periodontology.

In conjunction with the Great American Smokeout, the American Academy of Periodontology hopes to help educate the public about one specific threat to smokers – periodontal disease. Recent studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In addition, following periodontal treatment or any type of oral surgery, the chemicals in tobacco can slow down the healing process and make the treatment results less predictable.

How does smoking increase your risk for periodontal disease? As a smoker, you are more likely than nonsmokers to have the following problems:

  • Calculus – plaque that hardens on your teeth and can only be removed during a professional cleaning
  • Deep pockets between your teeth and gums
  • Loss of the bone and tissue that support your teeth

If the calculus is not removed during a professional cleaning, and it remains below your gum line, the bacteria in the calculus can destroy your gum tissue and cause your gums to pull away from your teeth. When this happens, periodontal pockets form and fill with disease-causing bacteria.

If left untreated, periodontal disease will progress. The pockets between your teeth and gums can grow deeper, allowing in more bacteria that destroy tissue and supporting bone. As a result, the gums may shrink away from the teeth making them look longer. Without treatment, your teeth may become loose, painful and even fall out.

Save Your Smile

Research shows that smokers loose more teeth than nonsmokers do. In fact, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only about 20 percent of people over age 65 who have never smoked are toothless, while a whopping 41.3 percent of daily smokers over age 65 are toothless.In addition, research shows that current smokers don’t heal as well after periodontal treatment as former smokers or nonsmokers. But these effects are reversible if the smokers kick the habit before beginning treatment.

Not Just Cigarettes

Other tobacco products are also harmful to your periodontal health. Smokeless tobacco also can cause gums to recede and increase the chance of losing the bone and fibers that hold your teeth in place.And, a study of cigar and pipe smokers published in the January, 1999 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association revealed that cigar smokers experience tooth loss and alveolar bone loss at rates equivalent to those of cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers experience tooth loss at a rate similar to cigarette smokers.

Other Oral Problems

Researches also have found that the following problems occur more often in people who use tobacco products:

  • Oral cancer
  • Bad breath
  • Stained teeth
  • Tooth loss
  • Bone loss
  • Loss of taste
  • Less success with periodontal treatment
  • Less success with dental implants
  • Gum recession
  • Mouth sores
  • Facial wrinkling

Find Out More

If you are interested in more information about tobacco use and periodontal disease, here are some steps to take:

© The American Academy of Periodontology. All rights reserved



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8 Responses to “Gum Disease and Smoking-It’s so Glamorous”

  1. Narnie Says:

    This blog is becoming a wonderful personal diary as well as an informative resource – perfect blogging.

  2. Lynn Says:

    Hi emctara57!

    Sorry to hear about your teeth. Stay smoke free! 31 days smoke free here. Food for thought… Seems like we have so much in common.. Have you had your cholesterol checked since you quit? I did. I was told three months ago that I needed to start meds to lower my cholesterol. Last week I had it checked again. Can you believe my cholesterol level got 3 times worse after being on the med for 3 months?? Now I need to take 2 cholesterol lowering meds. I am not overweight, in fact I have only gained two pounds since I quit smoking. (Knock on WOOD) I eat fairlly well. My only problem, I am sedentary. I start Ridding the AirDyne yesterday.

    Take it easy emcarta57.

    Hey, forgot to mention, I just got a new camera! Like I said b/4, to bad I don’t understand all of the settings. I understand the manual and how to change the settings, I just don’t know what to use when…

  3. Four new anti-smoking strategies Says:

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  4. emctara57 Says:

    Thanks Narnie! What a nice compliment, coming from you and since I love your site!

  5. emctara57 Says:

    Hey Lynn! What kind of camera did you get? My goal is a Nikon D40. It is an DSLR and I hope to have it by Summer. It’s tough to decide between the camera or the Giant Bike I want. Oh well, that is a happy dilemma, they both cost about the same and I am grateful to have the energy and stamina I need to use either one. Whether hiking on the trails with Sonny or riding the Katy Trail in Missouri! Woo Hoo! I love being smoke free! Congrats on 30 days! Awesome deal isn’t it?? Don’t forget to reward yourself. That is so important. I bought me a water purifier pitcher so i wouldn’t have to buy the bottled water. Now I just refill the bottles with my own water from the fridge. It didn’t cost much but it made me feel special. I used to never drink water until I quit smoking. Now I drink it all the time.

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  7. Cathy DeMarco Says:

    This is so right on. I’m going through an incredibly expensive and extensive procedure right now due to being diagnosed with severe periodontal disease. I had had three previous gum surgeries. I smoked even though I knew better. If you want to read another real story, see my blog at cathydemarco.wordpress.com. Oh, and I quit smoking on March 11, 2009.

    Is this still an active blog? Hope you’re still smoke-free, 19 months later.

  8. EMC Says:

    Thanks Cathy! Yes this is still and active blog and I am still smoke-free, 19 months later! Congrats to you on 4 months! Wow! That is fantastic. Keep me posted.


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