It’s Tough Staying Healthy

I felt Healthier before I went to the Doctor!

Smoke Free 200 Days!

I went to the Doctor for my “Well Woman” visit. I weigh 173 lbs. Ugggghhhhh!!! I have to have a colonoscopy because I am over 50. Uggghhhhh! I have to have my yearly July 31st. Ugggghhhhh! My osteoporosis rating was T -2.5. last fall and he ask if I was taking my Fosamax and I told him I was going to take care of that myself with Calcium Supplements and Walking. Oh no, he said that won’t do it. I have to rebuild the bone! I have to take osteo medicine. so I am going to call my insurance and see if they will cover the once a year Reclast shot. Uggggghhhh! I hate going to the Doc. I couldn’t eat and was poked & prodded, took blood from my little veins, and had an EKG with hairy legs. Uggggghhhhhh! I’m not doing this again for another 5 -10 years. It’s too much work. Luckily I broke it up by doing the Bone Density and Mammogram last fall and the Chest X-Ray and my Eye-Exam. It’s tough trying to stay healthy.

And did the Doc care that I walk everyday? No, he was not impressed. Did he care that I hadn’t had a cig for 6 months? Kind of happy but didn’t jump up and down or pat me on the back and say, “Good Job”. He didn’t say my lungs sounded better or nothing. He listened to my heart a lot, like even in my neck with the stethoscope. Kind of weird I thought.

Anyway, it all ended with me not being able to pee in the cup so I figured I will do that when I go on the 31st to the Lady Doc there for my yearly. Oh, and the lab gal sent me home with a poop card. Ugggghhhhh! It was a wonderful day…

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Gum Disease and Smoking-It’s so Glamorous

Smoke Free for 9 days!

There is a couple of things I want to talk about today regarding not-smoking and this new life I have chosen for myself. First, for all of you young people that are smoking out there, one of the many disadvantages to smoking is Gum Disease. If I wasn’t so vain I would take a picture of my teeth and show you.

This picture from Oral Health Information is pretty close. It’s not pretty is it girls! Trust me, quit smoking now so this doesn’t happen to you. The Oral Health Information site has a lot of good information about quitting smoking. Check it out!

Gum Diseased Teeth

Today I am having six teeth pulled on my upper mouth. Having made the decision to get dentures, which I should have done a long time ago, this is the first step of many and it is painful and awful to go through. No, it’s not as horrible as Lung Cancer, but it is something a lot of us, especially us ladies, particularly single ladies, don’t want to have to do in our lifetime. They are pulling six today and the other six on top, (the front ones) in three weeks. Unfortunately, I have a big mouth and when I smile you can see all my teeth,even in the back. So…for the next three weeks I am going to have to not smile. Isn’t that just great. I have been trying not to smile to big for about two years now since my teeth got really bad, it doesn’t always work because basically I am a happy person and have always smiled at people, strangers and all, just about all my life. It would be interesting to see their reaction though! 🙂 Just kidding, maybe..

Please read the article below. I will write more when I can. The other topic I want to talk about is Yoga, and Pilates and how much I hate them because they make me sick, (like motion sickness) nauseated, dizzy and I’ve had to run out of class because I thought I was going to throw up!

TTFN

Here is what the American Academy of Periodontology.

In conjunction with the Great American Smokeout, the American Academy of Periodontology hopes to help educate the public about one specific threat to smokers – periodontal disease. Recent studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In addition, following periodontal treatment or any type of oral surgery, the chemicals in tobacco can slow down the healing process and make the treatment results less predictable.

How does smoking increase your risk for periodontal disease? As a smoker, you are more likely than nonsmokers to have the following problems:

  • Calculus – plaque that hardens on your teeth and can only be removed during a professional cleaning
  • Deep pockets between your teeth and gums
  • Loss of the bone and tissue that support your teeth

If the calculus is not removed during a professional cleaning, and it remains below your gum line, the bacteria in the calculus can destroy your gum tissue and cause your gums to pull away from your teeth. When this happens, periodontal pockets form and fill with disease-causing bacteria.

If left untreated, periodontal disease will progress. The pockets between your teeth and gums can grow deeper, allowing in more bacteria that destroy tissue and supporting bone. As a result, the gums may shrink away from the teeth making them look longer. Without treatment, your teeth may become loose, painful and even fall out.

Save Your Smile

Research shows that smokers loose more teeth than nonsmokers do. In fact, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only about 20 percent of people over age 65 who have never smoked are toothless, while a whopping 41.3 percent of daily smokers over age 65 are toothless.In addition, research shows that current smokers don’t heal as well after periodontal treatment as former smokers or nonsmokers. But these effects are reversible if the smokers kick the habit before beginning treatment.

Not Just Cigarettes

Other tobacco products are also harmful to your periodontal health. Smokeless tobacco also can cause gums to recede and increase the chance of losing the bone and fibers that hold your teeth in place.And, a study of cigar and pipe smokers published in the January, 1999 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association revealed that cigar smokers experience tooth loss and alveolar bone loss at rates equivalent to those of cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers experience tooth loss at a rate similar to cigarette smokers.

Other Oral Problems

Researches also have found that the following problems occur more often in people who use tobacco products:

  • Oral cancer
  • Bad breath
  • Stained teeth
  • Tooth loss
  • Bone loss
  • Loss of taste
  • Less success with periodontal treatment
  • Less success with dental implants
  • Gum recession
  • Mouth sores
  • Facial wrinkling

Find Out More

If you are interested in more information about tobacco use and periodontal disease, here are some steps to take:

© The American Academy of Periodontology. All rights reserved



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Quitting Smoking and Weight Gain

Smoke Free 8 days!

Today I would like to talk about weight gain since I quit smoking November 19, 2007 and relapsed, (had 7 cigs) New Years Day. My total weight gain in seven weeks has been a ton! When I quit smoking I weighed 142 lbs. I am 5’8″ so that wasn’t too bad. I still wore a size 8 or 10, mostly because of my belly. Menopause changes a body. I have been very lucky, up until I was 48 years old, I have been a size 8, never had to diet or exercise. So I have been very spoiled all my life. Now the bad news…I weigh 158 lbs. Ugggh! I can hardly look at that number. I have gained 16 lbs, a little over 2 lbs. a week. I have joined a gym but, with the holidays, have not been able to go regularly. I love walking Sonny but, the cold weather has slowed that down. At work I do nothing but sit at my desk all day. It’s not like I am chained to it, I could get up and run up and down five flights of stairs if I wanted to but, who would really WANT to do that? Okay, enough of the BUTS! Enough of the I CAN”T MAKE TIME! Enough of the EXCUSES! It’s time to get off my arse and get moving!

My eating habits have always been pretty good:

a.) Never eat after 7:00 p.m.
b.) Always leave the last bite on the plate, (or give it to Sonny).
c.) Control my portions by thinking of the size of the palm of hand and not put more than that.

The down side of my eating has been getting enough fruits and vegetables. I have changed that since I quit smoking, now I have at least two fruits a day. I have also added Lifesaver Mints, Pretzels, Werthers, and Peppermints to my diet also. The food, (if you want to call it that), that I have added, has helped me with the “habit” of reaching for something to put in my mouth. So far it has been working and highly recommend all of them.

Bottom line on weight gain. I read once that a person that quits smoking would have to gain 100 lbs. to do the same damage to their body that smoking does. Well, 16 lbs is nothing and I can lose that, but right now I am not going to “diet”, or freak out about it. I am going to the Goodwill and buying size 12 pants/jeans for $3.00 and will wear those until this passes. Then I will “re-gift” them to Goodwill for the next lady that needs a larger size, (not that a 12 is all that large by any means), while she is quitting smoking. Another bonus about weight gain, you should return to your pre-quitting weight by 6 months to 1 year after quitting.

So, I am going to hang in there and keep plugging along one day at a time, and ask my Higher Power to keep me smoke free today, and thank Him tonight for the Grace He gave me so I would not smoke. For that I am truly grateful.



TTFN


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Hello world!

Hello all! This is my first post on this cool site. Below is what I am all about!
Scrapbooking & Photography & Life at 50
Just some pics and blogs about scrapbooking and what’s going on in my life today at 50 years old. I am a non-smoker in progress! Nicotine Free for 16 days (Dec. 4, 2007). How I’m doing and how the Sonny (my Cocker), and the kids are holding up. My love for cycling, photography, and life.